World Cup 2010 Ad Campaigns:

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Nandos Tongue In Cheek Adverts

Nandos and their tongue in cheek adverts were very successful. Their traditional approach to breaking through the advertising clutter worked wonders during the period of the Soccer World Cup 2010. They were strategic and creative in their approach which enabled the brand to stand out from all the other brands during this time period. Therefore for an unofficial sponsor of the World Cup 2010 there were other successful ways to work around FIFA’s strict by-laws, Nandos kept to their traditional advertising methods and used humor and media (current newsworthy events) to their advantage which got consumers talking about the brand.

Click on the link below to view one of their T.V adverts:

Bavaria Stunt:

The Dutch brewery, Bavaria gained a great amount of brand awareness through exposure of their brand through a publicity campaign which was generated through their ambush marketing stunt. Bavaria created a stir when they organised a publicity stunt at the Holland VS Denmark match hosted in Durban at the Moses Mabhida Stadium during the World Cup 2010, which involved a group of girls wearing orange mini dresses which revealed a very tiny branded label on the bottom of the dresses, only visible to those who paid very close attention.

Bavaria’s ambush marketing stunt, as FIFA called it, created brand awareness worth a value of R 756, 728 through free publicity generated in South African newspaper and broadcast news coverage. This value is only a portion of it, Bavaria gained a total value worth R1 million in local coverage yet their main publicity value was generated from the publicity they received back home in Holland and internationally.  This publicity campaign was a great success as it played on the audience’s emotions as it created a ‘good guy’, ‘bad guy’ personification and this became the instant news which followed by extensive media coverage.

The media blatantly positioned the Dutch Brewery and the beautiful women wearing the bright orange mini dresses as the victims of the story and FIFA as the evil villain. Whether or not Bavaria planned the ambush stunt or not is irrelevant. It is obvious that the public would be drawn to read an article where 30 gorgeous woman, dressed in the same orange mini-skirts to attend the Netherlands and Denmark soccer match on the 14th June during the Soccer World Cup 2010 hosted at Soccer City. The women were taken in for questioning and eventually two of them (Barbara Castelein and MirteNieuwpoort), whom Fifa accused of being the organisers of the campaign, were threatened with prosecution for a criminal offence and arrested. They faced charges of contravening the SA Merchandise Marks Act because Bavaria was not an official World Cup sponsor. FIFA took this seriously as they were trying to protect their main official sponsor Budweiser, as Bavaria is a direct competitor in the beer beverage industry. Yet the legal stir created by FIFA played straight into Bavaria’s hands as the free and extensive publicity generated from the stunt was worth the R10 000 bail fees and are simple the fee’s paid to gain brand awareness around a mega sports event as the target audience who follows this event is huge.

The Charges against the girls were dropped after Bavaria reportedly agreed not to embark on any ambush marketing for the next 12 years and “to respect the integrity of Fifa’s commercial programme”.1

It is probable that similar legislation will be introduced in respect of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, and potentially also for other forthcoming major sporting events. For example, New Zealand has passed new laws against ambush marketing at major events such as the 2011 Rugby World Cup and 2015 Cricket World Cup.2